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Joan of Shark: World's Largest White Shark Tagged

Apr 18 2014, 9:14am CDT | by , in News | Other Stuff

Joan of Shark Tagged as one of the Largest Shark
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A shark that has been tagged recently, Joan of Shark, is slated to be one of the largest great white sharks ever seen. It has a length that is in excess of 16 feet.

She was nicknamed Joan of Shark and she frightened fishermen when she turned up at the beach. Having been attracted to the rotting carcass of a whale that had been abandoned on the beach off the Aussie coast, Joan of Shark came snooping and had the tagging equipment surgically implanted inside her. 

The beach has been declared strictly off limits to human beings. The shark weighs 1.6 tons and is 16 feet long. In other words, it is one big and mighty whopper. The satellite that detected its presence on the beach signalled the marine life authorities who came to attend to it. 

After the tag was fitted in her belly, Joan of Shark was allowed back into the ocean. Many local swimmers and deep sea divers have been savaged and killed by great white sharks in the past. There have been discussions over putting an end to the menace they pose as a species to man. 

While the beach has been cleared of the whale, the shark is still free and in the vicinity. Swimmers and beachcombers have been cautioned to stay away from the area since the danger is always there that the great white may attack someone. 

The tagging will allow for the great white termed Joan of Shark to be monitored for the next decade or so. The shark had been originally put in a sedative state so as to implant the tag. It was on its stomach and although the procedure was pretty tough with such a large creature of the deep seas, the whole process got carried out safely in the end.

“Obviously, with that whale incident and because of the distress signals that it would have sent out, it would have attracted sharks and they will probably frequent the beach for the next few days,” said Martin Kleeman, a spokesman for the state department of fisheries. 

The shark is itself three decades old and although some say it is not the largest, it is big enough to bite back alright. The largest ever seen was a 25 feet monster that was once involved in an attack on an individual in Hawaii.    

"For the next 10 years, we'll be able to keep a track of her movements, which is going to open up a whole new world," Kleeman continued. "We'll have a better understanding of the large-scale movements of white sharks."

Source: Telegraph

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