Tyrannosaurus And Allosaurus Jaws Opened Widest

Posted: Nov 4 2015, 1:45pm CST | by , Updated: Nov 4 2015, 9:06pm CST, in News | Latest Science News


Tyrannosaurus and Allosaurus Jaws Opened Widest
Credit: Stephan Lautenschlager

New study finds that Tyrannosaurus and Allosaurus were capable of a wide gape of up to 90 degrees.

Just how big of a bite could dinosaurs take? A new study found out and as expected T-Rex topped the list. The study confirms that T-Rex along with the Allosaurus could open their jaws up to 90 degrees. Hollywood movies with dinosaurs do not have to be edited. T-Rex toy figures do not have to be changed. 

Using digital models and computer analyses, Dr Stephan Lautenschlager from Bristol's School of Earth Sciences studied the muscle strain during jaw opening of three different theropod dinosaurs with different dietary habits.  

Dr Lautenschlager said: “Theropod dinosaurs, such a Tyrannosaurus rex or Allosaurus, are often depicted with widely-opened jaws, presumably to emphasise their carnivorous nature. Yet, up to now, no studies have actually focused on the relation between jaw musculature, feeding style and the maximal possible jaw gape.”

The research looked at Tyrannosaurus rex, a large-sized meat-eating theropod with a massively built skull and up to 15cm long teeth; Allosaurus fragilis, a more lightly built but predatory and meat-eating theropod; and Erlikosaurus andrewsi, a closely related but plant-eating member of the theropod family.

Dino Jaws

Dr Lautenschlager said: “All muscles, including those used for closing and opening the jaw, can only stretch a certain amount before they tear.  This considerably limits how wide an animal can open its jaws and therefore how and on what it can feed.”

In order to fully understand the relation between muscle strain and jaw gape, detailed computer models were created to simulate jaw opening and closing, while measuring the length changes in the digital muscles. The dinosaur species in the study were also compared to their living relatives, crocodiles and birds, for which muscle strain and maximal jaw gape are known.

The study found that the carnivorous Tyrannosaurus and Allosaurus were capable of a wide gape (up to 90 degrees), while the herbivorous Erlikosaurus was limited to small gape (around 45 degrees).

Between the two carnivores, results show that Tyrannosaurus could produce a sustained muscle (and, therefore, bite) force for a wide range of jaw angles, which would be necessary for biting through meat and skin and crushing bone.

Dr Lautenschlager said: “We know from living animals that carnivores are usually capable of larger jaw gapes than herbivores, and it is interesting to see that this also appears to be the case in theropod dinosaurs.”

The paper "Estimating cranial musculoskeletal constraints in theropod dinosaurs" by Stephan Lautenschlager has been published in Royal Society Open Science.

You May Like


The Author

<a href="/latest_stories/all/all/2" rel="author">Luigi Lugmayr</a>
Luigi Lugmayr () is the founding chief Editor of I4U News and brings over 15 years experience in the technology field to the ever evolving and exciting world of gadgets. He started I4U News back in 2000 and evolved it into vibrant technology magazine.
Luigi can be contacted directly at ml@i4u.com.




Leave a Comment

Share this Story

Follow Us
Follow I4U News on Twitter
Follow I4U News on Facebook

You Also Like


Read the Latest from I4U News