Genes Determine Whether You Live Up To 100 Years, Says Study

Posted: Dec 21 2015, 12:10am CST | by , Updated: Dec 21 2015, 8:28pm CST, in News | Latest Science News


Genes Determine Whether You Live Up to 100 Years, Says Study
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Researchers find four genes that are linked to longevity.

Whether you live up to 100 years or more, it does not purely depend on your healthy lifestyle or your eating habits. In fact, the secret of living long lies in your genes, a new study suggests.

Researchers from Stanford University have examined the genomes of several people living in their 100th year of age and came up with some exciting results. They found there are four genes in particular that are associated with extreme longevity. 

One gene is called ABO, which determines the blood type of a person. The second is called CDKN2B and it regulates cell division, third gene is APOE which is linked to Alzheimer’s disease while the fourth one is SH2B3 which is previously found to extend the lifespan of fruit flies.

Researchers believe that these are some genes that strongly affect a person’s risk of getting major chronic diseases such as heart disease, dementia etc. 

“Some genetic variants that confer protection from disease could also associate with increased lifespan, and might show enrichment in centenarians and other long-lived populations.” Study reads. 

Many previous studies have also attempted to find the different variants between the centenarians’ genome and other people but they proved rather unsuccessful.

“Because you search through hundreds of thousands, and now millions of variants, there is a lot of noise. So it makes it difficult to see the signal amidst all the noise.” Stuart Kim, professor of developmental biology and genetics at Stanford University and lead author of the study, said. 

The latest study narrowed the search to exactly those genes that increase the chances of spread of chronic diseases in humans. Naturally, these diseases will increase the risk of dying early and decrease the chances of long life.

Researchers first looked at longevity-linked genes in about 800 people over age 100 and more than 5,000 people over age 90. After the initial research, researchers found eight genes linked to long lifespan but upon further analysis of about 1,000 people over age 100 or so, they were able to confirm four genes. 

Researchers are hoping to uncover more genes in the future which are linked to very long life and also how those genes affect the aging process.

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The Author

Hira Bashir covers daily affairs around the world.




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