Rare Venomous Sea Snake Washes Up On California Coast

Posted: Jan 15 2016, 6:54pm CST | by , in News | Latest Science News


Rare Venomous Sea Snake Washes up on California Coast
NBC7 Video Screenshot
  • A yellow-bellied sea snake washed up on the California coast!

The lifeguards from the Coronado north beach placed the 20 inch snake in a bucket, but it died shortly after.

A yellow-bellied sea snake was found washed up on the Coronado north beach on Tuesday. The 20 inch long venomous snake is rarely seen on the California coast.

The sea snake was first discovered by a citizen around 2:30 p.m. on Dog Beach. Dog beach is situated near the Naval Air Station North Island. The snake was then brought to the attention of lifeguards.

The lifeguards placed the barely alive snake in a bucket to secure it. However the snake died shortly after, according to NBC San Diego. The Coronado lifeguards snapped a picture of the potentially dangerous creature. The picture shows the snake was found not far from a lifeguard tower.

The yellow-bellied sea snake is normally found in tropical oceanic waters. The snake species is distinctive because of its black top half and bright yellow lower half. The lifeguards contacted several local snake experts who confirmed it was a yellow-bellied snake.

It is the second time a second yellow-bellied sea snake has washed up on Southern California shores. Another yellow-bellied snake was discovered in Huntington Beach on the 12th of December.

Before that in October 2015 two yellow-bellied snakes were seen in Oxnard, California. This is the first time multiple yellow-bellied snakes have been seen in California. The last time a yellow-bellied snake was seen in California was in 1972. 

According to the Surf-rider experts the snakes are now appearing due to El Nino. El Nino is an effect of global warming in which water temperatures get warmer.

The snakes are coming farther north to feed on small fish and eels due to rising temperatures. The yellow-bellied snake is typically found in the warmer waters of the Pacific and Indian oceans.

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<a href="/latest_stories/all/all/20" rel="author">Sumayah Aamir</a>
Sumayah Aamir (Google+) has deep experience in analyzing the latest trends.




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