Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, And Saturn All Come Together For Visibility Till February

Posted: Jan 21 2016, 2:02am CST | by , Updated: Jan 22 2016, 3:55pm CST, in News | Latest Science News


Five planets in the visible sky
Photo credit: Museum Victoria/Stellarium, CC BY-SA

If you have always wanted to catch sight of the five planets at the same time across the bright sky, then this is the time to do just that. For the first time in over 10 years, you can see Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn at the same time starting an hour before sunrise, stretching from the high north to the low east - according to The Conversation.

As the dawn breaks from across Australia, the planets will be visible for all to see – at least to those looking for them anyway. Beginning from Wednesday, January 20, the five planets will be there to see up till the end of February. The planets have been there since this year began, but had not been too prominent in the morning sky until now.

Jupiter can be seen up in the north with its bright light, while Mars follows with its reddish glow, and pale Saturn can be observed next before Venus with its brilliance comes up in the eastern distance, and then Mercury completes the picture for the planet family.

In case you want to be specific with the dates on which the planets will shift positions for more visibility, you can be certain that the moon will be closest to Jupiter on January 28. Then the moon will be beside Mars on February 1 and below it on February 2. But in the morning of February 4, the moon in its last quarter crescent phase will be closer to Saturn before joining with Venus on February 6, after which it will be barely visible as it sits below Mercury on February 7.

The best way to see all the five planets at the same time is to choose a vantage point where you can see from the north to the east without necessarily moving. But to be exact about the time for each planet’s flight across the horizon, you might want to check NASA’s Spot the Station and Heavens Above websites for specific time of when each planet might pass over your city.

Whether you catch a glimpse of the five planets together this time or not, the good news is that they will gather together again by August, being visible in the evening sky for all to see.     

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The Author

<a href="/latest_stories/all/all/52" rel="author">Charles I. Omedo</a>
Charles is covering the latest discoveries in science and health as well as new developments in technology. He is the Chief Editor or Intel-News.




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