Aspirin May Up Cancer Survival By 20 Percent

Posted: Apr 24 2016, 4:07am CDT | by , in News | Latest Science News


Aspirin May Up Cancer Survival by 20 Percent
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Taking a low-dose of aspirin is likely to increase the survival of patients receiving cancer treatment by up to 20 percent as well as stop their cancer from spreading, says a new research.

Researchers found a significant reduction in mortality and spread of cancer in patients who took a low-level dose of aspirin in addition to their cancer treatment.

"Our review, based on the available evidence, suggests that low-dose aspirin taken by patients with bowel, breast or prostate cancer, in addition to other treatments, is associated with a reduction in deaths of about 15-20 percent, together with a reduction in the spread of the cancer," said lead research Peter Elwood, professor at Cardiff University in Britain.

For the study, published in the journal PLOS ONE, the team conducted a review, of the available data including five randomized trials and forty-two observational studies of colorectal, breast and prostate cancers.

"There is a growing body of evidence that taking aspirin is of significant benefit in reducing some cancers," Elwood said

"Whilst we know a low-dose of aspirin has been shown to reduce the incidence of cancer, its role in the treatment of cancer remains uncertain," he added.

The study highlights the need for randomized trials to establish the evidence needed to support low-dose aspirin as an effective additional treatment of cancer.

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