There Is A Link Between Weather And Chronic Pain, Smartphone Study Suggests

Posted: Sep 10 2016, 1:09pm CDT | by , Updated: Sep 10 2016, 1:14pm CDT, in News | Latest Science News


There is a Link Between Weather and Chronic Pain, Smartphone Study Suggests
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New study reveals that rain and lack of sunshine worsen chronic pain

Rain can worsen your body aches.

It has been long assumed that weather has an effect on pain. Now, a study is also backing up this theory. Thousands of people have reported that rainy and cloudy weather aggravates their long-term pain while warm weather make their pain less severe, indicating there is a connection between weather and chronic pain.

More than 9000 people suffering from chronic pain such as arthritis, back pain and migraines participated in 'Cloudy with a Chance of Pain' project. For the project, participants were asked to record their daily pain symptoms on a special smartphone app. The app automatically tracks the weather condition of the participants using their smartphone GPS and allows researchers to look at the data. 

Though, the study is just halfway through but already showing a strong connection between weather pattern and changes in pain. People reported less time in severe pain from February to April during warm weathers. But complained about increase in pain in the month of June when the weather is traditionally rainy and gloomy. The findings are specifically aimed at people living in 3 cities: Leeds, Norwich, and London

"In almost every clinic, one of my patients will tell me that their joints are better or worse because of the weather,” said lead researcher Professor Will Dixon from University of Manchester. “And yet researchers have never worked out whether this relationship truly exists.”

The findings will help researchers better understand the affects of weather on chronic pain, which eventually help people suffering from chronic pain to better deal with their problem. But researchers are still seeking more people to reach a robust conclusion and inviting them to become a part of this breakthrough research. 

“To work out the details of how weather influences pain, we need as many people as possible to participate in the study and track their symptoms on their smartphone,” Dixon said.

“Once the link is proven, people will have the confidence to plan their activities in accordance with the weather. In addition, understanding how weather influences pain will allow medical researchers to explore new pain interventions and treatments.” 

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Hira Bashir covers daily affairs around the world.




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