Can You Do Your Work From An IPad? Yes You Can

Posted: Apr 9 2010, 7:00am CDT | by , Updated: Aug 11 2010, 8:29pm CDT, in News | Apple


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Over the last few days, I have been spending a lot of time with the "magical" iPad and the device is capable of so much. The first time around I looked at the iPad and its eBook capabilities. Yesterday I looked at the iPad and its gaming prowess. Today I am back to look at the ability of the iPad to replace my netbook or notebook for work on the go.

When I first got my iPhone, I didn’t like the onscreen keyboard too much. Its keys are tiny and hard to press and typing quickly just isn't going to happen for most of us. When the iPad showed up at my door, I was worried that its onscreen keyboard would have the same issues for me as my iPhone.

I am very glad to say that isn’t the case. The onscreen keyboard of the iPad has large keys when in landscape mode and you can lay the iPad flat on a table and pound out long emails or text messages quickly. In fact, I found that I could type on the onscreen keyboard just about as fast on the iPad as I can on my notebook or netbook.

I have noticed that sometimes the keyboard flies and puts in letters or symbols as fast as I hit the keys. Other times the keyboard seems to create a bit of a backlog with a delay of a second or so before the letters are input. It’s like the thing will freeze for a second and then put three or four letters in at once. The typing remains accurate, but if you are looking at the screen, it can throw you off a bit.

The little clicks that the keys make from the speaker of the iPhone when you press them is annoying to me, thankfully, you can turn that off. The biggest issue with the iPad and typing or working from it exclusively for me is that it doesn't recognize lots of technical terms. If you have predictive spelling turned on, you will end up with lots of words in your text that are completely wrong.

You can turn off the predictive text feature and eliminate some of that problem. The iPad has a nice spell check feature that underlines the words it believes are wrong. You can touch the word and get possible correct spellings. Again, technical terms are not understood and will be marked incorrect most of the time.

I wish there was an easier way to add words to the dictionary in the iPad. I have often wished for the same feature on my iPhone too. This would eventually eliminate some of these spelling and word change issues with technical terms if the feature were offered.

You can get word processing on the iPad if you buy the $10 iWork style app for it. If you are a blogger type like me, you can simply type directly into the entry fields though. I have found over my time with the iPad that aside from the quirks with some words that I have mentioned, I can easily replace my netbook with the iPad. It can be a pain looking down at the screen if you work for a long time, but the Apple keyboard dock will fix that issue for you and may even make your typing faster.

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The Author

<a href="/latest_stories/all/all/3" rel="author">Shane McGlaun</a>
Leading our review center, Shane McGlaun (Google) knows technology inside out. His extensive experience in testing computer hardware and consumer electronics enable him to effectively qualify new products and trends. If you want us review your product, please contact Shane.
Shane can be contacted directly at




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