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Why the Tech Press Always Comes Crawling Back to Apple

Mar 3 2011, 5:32pm CST | by , in News | Apple

Why the Tech Press Always Comes Crawling Back to Apple
 
 

We just can't quit the iSauce.

As you've undoubtedly noticed, roughly 80% of the tech news and analysis being written right now either focuses on the iPad 2, or its impact on other tablets. And iPhone 5 rumors have leapt up to the forefront again. Apple is once more the darling of the industry press.

Which may seem a tad incongruous, if you're a regular follower of consumer electronics. The last two months have been nothing but a relentless parade of Android tablets. The Xoom won best-in-show at CES 2011. Samsung's Galaxy Tab 10.1" was the darling of MWC 2011. For weeks we've read reviews and hands-on reports and analysis all focused around which Android tablets would snatch the tablet market away from Apple.


Now, in the wake of the iPad 2, the top trending story about Motorola's new tablet bears the title, "Is the Motorola Xoom tablet toast?" The tech press is once again gaga for Apple, and we will be for weeks to come.

Some of this is a matter of perspective. When you're at a giant trade show, your view of the world narrows to the confines of that event. It's hard to keep a theoretical iPad 2 in mind when you're being blitzed on all sides by PR reps with shiny new tablets and carefully crafted demo videos. These events are designed to bamboozle journalists- and buyers, to viewing whatever product is in front of them as the focus and future of its ecosystem.

The truth is, big trade shows bring with them a sort of reality distortion field. When you're thrust into a teeming jungle of gadgets, it can be hard to accept that the real scope of the industry is much broader.

Apple has their own reality distortion field, as countless bloggers and journos before me have noted, but the Apple RDF extends far beyond any press conference or demo booth. Some of this is down to the enthralling wizardry of Steve Jobs. No other CEO is quite as good at convincing an audience of millions that he alone knows the future.

The future, of course, is what Apple really deals in. Their corporate focus- even in the Bad Old Days- has always been on pushing the envelope of what a computing experience can be. Which is why Apple demands so much control over their device ecosystem. They have a plan for the future, and they don't much care to make the formation of that plan a collaborative effort.

The tech press recoils from the strict, inflexible rule of Apple. We're always searching for the next great futurist, an open and innovative alternative to Apple. And we have yet to find it, even in Google's Android. Which is why, year after year, we find ourselves drawn back to the Apple mythos. They may be control-freaks and a little bit crazy, but they also do more to push this industry forward than any other company out there.

As long as Apple keeps their eyes on the horizon and their products a year ahead of the pack, we'll continue to fawn over every release. The nerd blood that courses through our veins will allow no less.

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