Menu
Megan Fox works with James Franco in Zeroville

Megan Fox to work with James Franco in Zeroville

Win $5,000 in the Big I4U News Black Friday 2014 Giveaway

Win $5,000 in the Big I4U News Black Friday 2014 Giveaway

Minka Kelly is Dating Captain America Star Chris Evans

Minka Kelly is Dating Captain America Star Chris Evans

Samsung Galaxy S5 to get Android 5.0 Update in December

Samsung Galaxy S5 to get Android 5.0 Update in December

Jenny McCarthy Dishes on Donnie Wahlberg's Penis

Jenny McCarthy Dishes on Donnie Wahlberg's Penis

Green Lantern 2D Earning More Than 3D

Jun 23 2011, 6:27pm CDT | by , in News | Home Entertainment

Green Lantern 2D Earning More Than 3D
 
 

Even with the 3D price premium...

In a remarkable twist of fate, one of the most anticipated 3D action flicks is not really doing it for moviegoers.

Green Lantern wasn't a flop by any means. Its opening weekend saw box office revenue of more than $53.4 million. But what is curious about that figure is the breakdown of 2D tickets versus 3D tickets.

According to research group BTIG, the latest DC Comics-inspired popcorn fest received 55% of its ticket sales from people who saw it in 2D. Only 45% of the revenue came from those paying for the 3D experience.

That's a bad sign for 3D, for sure, but it's even worse when you realize that 3D movie tickets cost a good premium over 2D movie tickets.

The end result in terms of actual viewers is that only 36.4% of Green Lantern moviegoers saw the 3D version. A whopping 73.6% of attendees went for the more basic 2D version.

This is the same scenario as Kung Fu Panda 2, which also saw a vast majority of audiences not willing to pay the 3D premium. And Kung Fu Panda 2 was available on more 3D screens than was Green Lantern. The former premiered on 3,979 3D-equipped screens, while the latter only hit 3,200.


So what does this mean for the future of 3D? This isn't just a fluke; it seems to be a trend at this point.

BTIG analyst Richard Greenfield summed up his group's take on the numbers, saying in a statement, "There simply is not enough demand domestically for most movies in 3D to have them occupy 4,000 3D screens. We sense U.S. exhibitors have already over-expanded their 3D-screen footprint."

Via Hollywood Reporter.

Recommended For You

Comments

blog comments powered by Disqus