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Printed Batteries are the Future for Wearable Devices

Jun 28 2012, 6:16am CDT | by , in News | Technology News

Printed Batteries are the Future for Wearable Devices
 
 

The technological limits of wearable devices is pretty much limited by the current battery technology. A new crop of startups are working on new battery technologies that will remove those limits. One of them is Imprint Energy.

A wearable device today is basically designed around a battery. Sometimes you still get actually a separate batter pack that you have to hide somewhere. Imprint Energy's Zinc Poly technology has the potential to change that. Imprint Energy will present at the Wearable Technologies Conference II 2012 in San Francisco on July 24. This conference is the place to be if you are in the wearable technology field. 


Brooks Kincaid is the Co-founder and Head of Business at Imprint Energy. He is intimately familiar with wearable technologies in the health and fitness markets and is eager to see Imprint Energy’s advanced battery technology enable new and improved products. His presentation, Rethinking the Battery, will cover how Imprint Energy is redefining the limits of portable power by pioneering battery technology that will satisfy the energy, cost, and design needs of portable consumer electronics, wearable health monitoring, compact wireless devices, and printed electronics.

The presentation will highlight Imprint Energy’s proprietary Zinc Poly technology, which represents an electrochemistry breakthrough. Zinc Poly battery technology removes fundamental limitations on the recharge-ability of zinc-based batteries.  It offers energy density, cost and form factor advantages over the Lithium polymer batteries often used in wearable technology products. 

The presentation will also describe how Imprint Energy’s, low-cost printing-based manufacturing process offers new freedom to design novel shaped, thin and flexible electronics that can be fit to the human body and be more space efficient.

To registration for the Wearable Technologies Conference is still open. Register here. See the full agenda here.

See also the Imprint Energy site.

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