Rubber That Self Heals Invented By French Researchers

Posted: Feb 21 2008, 9:40am CST | by , Updated: Aug 11 2010, 6:22am CDT, in News | Other Stuff

 
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French researchers have invented a new material that is able to self-repair even when cut in half. The material is unnamed at this time, but is a form of artificial rubber made from vegetable oil and what is described as a component of urine.

According to the BBC the surface of the material retains a strong chemical attraction to the other half when cut. The material joins back together again after a cut without the need for glue or a special treatment of any sort.

The researchers are reportedly already making large quantities of the material in their lab and say that the process is almost completely green and with a few adjustments could be completely green. This material has a hoard of potential uses, the most obviously being tires that never need patching.

Via BBC News.

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<a href="/latest_stories/all/all/3" rel="author">Shane McGlaun</a>
Tech and Car expert Shane McGlaun (Google) reports about what's new in these two sectors. His extensive experience in testing cars, computer hardware and consumer electronics enable him to effectively qualify new products and trends. If you want us review your product, please contact Shane.
Shane can be contacted directly at shane@i4u.com.

 

 

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