Vaginal Bacteria Cause Premature Birth

Posted: Aug 19 2015, 7:17am CDT | by , in News | Latest Science News

 

Vaginal Bacteria Cause Premature Birth
Getty Images
  • Vaginal Bacteria culture found to be a marker of preterm birth
 

Researchers found that the deficiency of a certain bacteria leads risks of the preterm birth among women.

In a recent study, researchers found that the bacterial culture in a women’s vagina could lead to preterm birth. Birth of the baby before 37 weeks of gestation are termed as preterm birth. 11 percent of the births around the world fall into this category. 

The study consisted of 49 pregnant women. Their ages from 18 till 40 years. There bacterial composition was analyzed by their vaginal samples, stool, gums and saliva. 

The women were studied pre and post birth. 

The investigators found that the composition of vaginal bacteria in most women changed.  And the changes occured drastically right at the time of delivery. 

Researchers states their opinion about women in study. Women had an increased risk of preterm labor with lower levels of bacteria Lactobacillus in the vagina.

But the women whose vaginal bacterial communities were rich in this type of bacteria. The levels of Lactobacillus decreased after delivery. 

It was replaced by a diverse array of bacteria. This change persisted for up to one year later, according to the study.

Another observation is also revealed. Among the women with lower levels of Lactobacillus, a higher abundance of two other bacterial species was present. They were Gardnerella and Ureaplasma. 

The presence of these bacteria was tied to an even more pronounced risk of preterm labor.

Study author Dr. David Relman is a professor at Stanford University in California. He said that the first possible application is to use high-risk features in the vaginal microbiome as a marker. 

According to him the marker could be used as a diagnostic tool. And tool will identify women early in pregnancy who are destined to have a higher risk of preterm labor.

"The first possible application is to use high-risk features in the vaginal microbiome as a marker, as a diagnostic tool to identify women early in pregnancy who are destined to have a higher risk of preterm labor," Relman told Live Science.

Dr. Relman was adamant that the bacterial culture was yet to be confirmed as a proper marker. The study might be beneficial if the experiment was also recorded worldwide.  And correspondingly conclusive results were recorded around other parts of the world.

Further studies revealed that the bacterial culture changed in the vagina during pregnancy. It changes back to the normal body culture after birth. 

This story may contain affiliate links.

Comments

The Author

<a href="/latest_stories/all/all/20" rel="author">Sumayah Aamir</a>
Sumayah Aamir (Google+) has deep experience in analyzing the latest trends.

 

 

Advertisement

comments powered by Disqus