Android Pay, Google Partner With DonorsChoose To Raise $1 Million For Disadvantaged Pupils

Posted: Nov 25 2015, 10:42am CST | by , in News | Technology News

 

Android Pay
Photo credit: Google
 

In its bid to better the lives and promote the educational values of disadvantaged pupils with special needs, Google together with Android Pay have partnered with DonorsChoose.org to raise $1 million between now and the end of this year.

Statistics show there are about 6.4 million kids in the United States who require special educational needs, and Google in October promoted the stories of teachers who devised innovative techniques within the classroom setting to meet the needs of special children with disabilities.

And then, the social media giant had always been known for its Global Impact Challenge: Disabilities which raises the standard of life for children with special needs.

With this in mind, Android Pay has risen to the challenge of promoting that vision and donating $1 and up to $1 million for educational projects for kids with special needs.

The way it works is that between November 27 – Black Friday, and December 31, Android Pay has chosen to double every donation received for all Android Pay purchases. It will be quite easy for willing donors to give because Android Pay is accepted at over one million sites in the US; and donors can choose to learn more about how their donations would help pupils at school.

Google and others are already know that many teachers spend as much as $500 from their own pockets annually to personally provide kits and programs to enrich classroom works, and since each pupil has a way of learning different from others, it would be great for donors to complement the efforts of these teachers at bettering the lives of children with special needs.

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<a href="/latest_stories/all/all/52" rel="author">Charles I. Omedo</a>
Charles is covering the latest discoveries in science and health as well as new developments in technology. He is the Chief Editor or Intel-News.

 

 

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