Closest Supermoon Tonight Will Be Especially Super

Posted: Nov 14 2016, 9:21am CST | by , in News | Latest Science News

 

Closest Supermoon Tonight will be Especially Super
In one of Ingalls’ most iconic and widely-viewed images, this supermoon is seen as it rises near the Lincoln Memorial on March 19, 2011. Credits: NASA/Bill Ingalls
  • NASA Explains the Closest Supermoon Until 2034
 

NASA is focused on the largest supermoon to appear until a decade and a half in the future.

November’s supermoon is very close to the earth. In fact, it is the closest it will come till 2034. The skygazers and other who are bedazzled by the light of the stars and full moon will be out in the open staring at the expanse of the night sky above.

There is something very special about this supermoon. At its perigee, which is the closest point near the earth, it is not only a big moon but a very brilliant one. Such a supermoon has not been viewed in 69 years.

Only on November 25th, 2034 will such an occurrence recur, according to NASA. The experts at NASA were questioned regarding this supermoon. The supermoon, they said, was the closest full moon in the year.

Since the moon follows an elliptical path around the earth, it differs in its distance from our planet. A great many tidal and gravitational forces are also acting on the moon. This all has a very profound effect on the path the moon takes.

Approximately 70% of the earth is composed of water most of which is found in the oceans. These waterways influence the lunar orbit. The moon in its own way creates tidal patterns on the earth.

This year, for example, thanks to the supermoon, the tides will be higher than usual. This is not an extraordinary event. It was to be expected.

The lunar influence is not only on the tides but also on the earth’s upper crust. The land beneath us actually undergoes changes and geological formations thanks to the moon’s impact on it. 

At its perigee, the moon is 14% larger and 30% shinier. Such a subtle shift in distance from the planet earth causes the supermoon to appear different than a normal lunar view.

While tonight’s supermoon is larger and closer than usual, it has not broken the record of the past. In 1912, a supermoon was 100 kilometers closer than the full moon that will emerge in the sky at night today.

It is indeed a rare sight and not one to be missed by all skygazers and astronomers (whether they are professional or amateur).

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<a href="/latest_stories/all/all/20" rel="author">Sumayah Aamir</a>
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