Using Hands-Free While Driving Is As Dangerous As Holding The Phone

Posted: Dec 14 2016, 10:04am CST | by , in News | Latest Science News

 

Using Hands-Free While Driving is as Dangerous as Holding the Phone
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  • Employing a Hands-Free Set is as Dangerous as Using a Phone while in a Vehicle
 

It seems that employing a hands-free set is as dangerous as using a phone while driving in a vehicle. Its reputation for being safer has turned out to be fraudulent at best.

Using a smartphone in the form of a hands-free set is just as distracting as using it alone. This is just in from the latest research efforts which have taken place. The new warning came at a time when a study was carried out regarding the safety and security claims that hands-free set makers made.

The reaction times of drivers took 40% longer in either case. So instead of multitasking, the best thing to do was to just drive the car instead of doing other things while driving. 

The mental energy it takes to carry on a conversation takes away from reflex time while driving a car. The driver’s visual scanning patterns undergo certain changes not all of which are for the best. Ultimately, it is not the fault of the device but the fault of the driver.

The subjects’ reaction times and driving performativity were measured in a CARRS-Q Advanced Driving Simulator. This unique machine allows researchers a chance to measure driver behavior in varying conditions with accuracy and perception. 

While realism is the watchword, the drivers do not get injured which is a plus point of this methodology. This technique has been used to study damaged drivers, faulty road conditions, environmental glitches and last but not least the human-machine interface.

A group of drivers had a network of roads laid out before them and were told to drive the simulator. Simulated pedestrians were shown crossing their path. The drivers’ reaction times and performativity were also closely monitored. 

The delayed response was significant. Both hands-free and hands-held conversations while driving were not good strategies. They commonly tended to backfire.

What was found was paradoxical. “Holding or not holding” the smartphone was not what caused the driver to be prone to an accident. It was the conversation itself which was the stumbling block along the way.

The extra brain power the conversation took distracted the driver from the specific act of driving down the road. The process of driving and listening to someone speak in one’s ear and speaking back basically drained the brain.

This smartphone conversation was different in quality than a real life conversation in the car. Therefore the best way of tackling with the situation at hand is to implement laws that do not allow anyone to use their smartphones while driving. 

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<a href="/latest_stories/all/all/20" rel="author">Sumayah Aamir</a>
Sumayah Aamir (Google+) has deep experience in analyzing the latest trends.

 

 

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