Dendritic Cells Are Guards Of The Human Immune System

Posted: Dec 19 2016, 11:59am CST | by , in News | Latest Science News

 

Dendritic Cells are Guards of the Human Immune System
Dendritic cells in lymphatic tissues are mainly influenced by their genetic identity, while in non-lymphatic tissues -- such as lungs and skin -- dendritic cells are predominantly affected by tissue-specific factors. Credit: Carla Schaffer / AAAS
  • The Human Immune System has its Protectors
 

It seems that the human immune system has its protectors. Dendritic cells are a crucial part of mankind’s immunity drive.

Dendritic cells help the immune system engulf and destroy invading vectors. These cells may help in the genesis of various immunotherapies in the times to come.

Their name comes from the large number of dendrites on their surface. They team in the human body. As guardians they shift to lymph nodes and interact with other cells to cause an immune response of sorts. 

In mice at least, these dendritic cells tend to be divided into various subtypes. Their role in human beings is less well known. A recent study which delved into the immune system and dendritic cells found that via cytometry, their distribution could be predicted with accuracy.

Dendritic cells from human blood, spleen and thymus were analyzed. The genetic information encoded in the RNA was noted down. Novel methods were used to accomplish all this.

Within non-lymphatic organs such as the skin and lungs, the dendritic cells have a greater response as was found out by researchers. All this could have future implications for immunotherapy. 

Various diseases, that find a means of entry into the human body due to a compromised immune system, can thus be cured at one stroke in the future thanks to dendritic cells.

The traits of these dendritic cells make them important gatekeepers of the immune system. With a strong immune system, a person may remain healthy even in the most infectious of environments.

Yet with a  compromised immune system, all the hygiene in the world will not make an iota of difference. That is the paradox of health and disease.

The results of this study were recently published in the Journal Science Immunology.

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<a href="/latest_stories/all/all/20" rel="author">Sumayah Aamir</a>
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