International Space Station Crosses The Face Of The Sun In Stunning NASA Image

Posted: Dec 24 2016, 1:23pm CST | by , in News | Latest Science News

 

International Space Station Crosses the Face of the Sun in Stunning NASA Image
Credit: (NASA/Joel Kowsky)
 

NASA releases the incredible image of space station transit across the giant fireball

NASA has just released a stunning image of International Space Station passing in front of the Sun. 

The image, composite of 10 frames, was taken on December 17 from Newbury Park in California as the space station sailed across the sun at roughly five miles per second. 

A photo posted by NASA (@nasa) on

International Space Station, or ISS of short, is a spacecraft that was launched in 1998 and has been orbiting the Earth ever since. It is like a permanent home in orbit where astronauts live and conduct experiments to learn about inhospitable, microgravity conditions in space. The results could help launch long-term missions into the deep space.

Six people can stay here at a time. The space station is currently occupied by two US astronauts Shane Kimbrough and Peggy Whitson: Russian cosmonauts Andrey Borisenko, Sergey Ryzhikov, and Oleg Novitskiy and astronaut Thomas Pesquet from European Space Agency. 

ISS orbits about 220 miles above the Earth and travels at a speed of roughly 17, 150 miles per hour. It roughly takes 92 minutes to revolve once around the Earth. This means space station passes overhead multiple times a day from several thousand locations worldwide. 

Measuring 239 feet long and 356 feet wide, International Space Station is so huge that it can even be spotted naked eye. However, it is not easily detectable and looks like a bright star moving quickly above the skies.

This is not the first time when NASA has shared a composite image of space station moving across the sun. Last year, a NASA photographer has captured similar image from Shenandoah National Park in Virginia.

Source: NASA Blog

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