Bats Like To Talk A Lot Like Humans

Posted: Dec 28 2016, 8:12am CST | by , in News | Latest Science News

 

Bats Like to Talk a Lot Like Humans
A new study extracts critical information from bat vocalizations to offer a rare, informative look into the world of bat communication. Credt: Getty Images
  • New research shows Bats Argue, a Reason of Their Noise in Caves
 

New research shows bats noise is not just shouting, they socially communicate.

New research shows that bats are social mammals like humans. Bats use vocalizations to survive during their lifespan that goes from 20 to 30 years. These mammals live in groups, making colonies to interact with each other.

This research published in Scientific Reports at Tel Aviv University that gives rare info about bats’ communication.  Bats make noise that’s an evidence of their social communication that means bats are sophisticated species, stated the research team led by Prof. Yossi Yovel of the Department of Zoology at TAU's Faculty of Life Sciences.

Prof Yovel said that we hear gibberish noise of bats when we enter a bat cave, but this is not just shouting as we think bats talk to each other. The researchers’ main aim was to extract the information to see how much information the bats conveyed.

The research included 22 Egyptian fruit bats in TAU’s bat cave, and researchers studied these bats for 75 days. Mor Taub and Yosef Prat, students in Prof. Yovel's lab recorded  bats’ sounds.

The team recorded 15,000 vocalizations. After analyzing the data, the researchers discovered that the voices were in fact bats calling and their response to these calls.

The team also found that most noise was aggressive that means the bats argue on certain matters. The researchers observed the aggressive noise when bats were squabbling over food, or sleeping spots, etc.

This type of study becomes important to those who want to research on the evaluation of human language. The researchers found that bats’ calls have information about callers’identities that shows that recognition factor is involved in the communication, sated Prof. Yovel. 

The researchers extracted massive data, including many calls during 3 months of their research. The study found that bats fight over different things, like their sleeping positions, over food, over mating or they just argue.

Researchers were able to identify each noise in the darkness, and bats are ahead of humans in recognizing their calls. Even the researchers associated certain bat calls to greetings.

The team enjoyed the research as they often wanted to see how bats argument would end, stated Prof. Yovel, who is now researching further on bats accents and their social communities.

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<a href="/latest_stories/all/all/20" rel="author">Sumayah Aamir</a>
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