20000 Dead Sea Animals Wash Up On Canadian Coast

Posted: Dec 30 2016, 9:27am CST | by , in News | Latest Science News

 

20000 Dead Sea Animals Wash up on Canadian Shore
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  • Canadian shore transforms into marine life graveyard
 

Thousands of dead fish belonging to different species mysteriously wash up on the shore of Nova Scotia

The Canadian western coast of Nova Scotia has turned into a massive graveyard for thousands of fish. A number of different species carcasses mysteriously washed up on the shore.

It is estimated more than 20,000 fish, lobsters, starfish, scallops, crabs and other marine animals are amongst the carcass present on the coast of Savory Park.

What’s really baffling is the fact authorities have no idea why the fish washed ashore. Images of the dead fish were tweeted by the Canadian Fisheries and Oceans department.

According to CNN, the coast officers said that the fish found on the massive cross-species graveyard are believed to have died 4 to 5 days ago.

Already measures are being taken by the Canadian Environmental authorities to determine the cause of the death. Officials are currently testing the water for pesticides and oxygen levels, so they can come up with clues.

The authorities are also warning consumers to purchase seafood only from authorized vendors since some unscrupulous one may sell the dead fish found on the shores.

The Canadian Fisheries and Oceans department also tweeted the dead fish on the shores should not be collected by the general public since they could be contaminated and hazardous for health. 

The US Geological Survey weighed in on the matter and suggested a number of factors may have led to the death of the fish. The first suggestion is the fish were exposed to toxic material, while loss of oxygen in some particular marine region may have also led to the massive death of the fish.

This is not the first time massive quantities of dead fish have washed up ashore. Earlier in 2016 the same was seen on Florida's Indian River Lagoon and China’s Hongcheng Lake in Haikou. 

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