Simple Breath Test Using Breathalyzer Can Diagnose 17 Diseases

Posted: Jan 2 2017, 7:28am CST | by , in News | Latest Science News

 

Simple Breath Test Using Breathalyzer Can Diagnose 17 Diseases
 

New Breathalyzer would diagnose 17 diseases with one breath

Royal physicians are also known for the sniff noblemen excrement's test. Though, it sounds weird, but modern science declares that several diseases cause the body to make volatile compounds which can help in developing diagnostic methods.

During last 10 years, the researchers have created sniff tests for detecting diseases, like hypertension, tuberculosis, cystic fibrosis, and some cancers. For example, in case there is cystic fibrosis, the patient produces four times more acetic acid than healthy persons.

New researchers’ group is taking this technique further; the group is led by Hossam Haick at Israeli Institute of Technology. The team has developed a device named breathalyzer, a compact device that can detect 17 diseases from patient’s single breath.

The device has a series of specially developed gold nano particles that have a size of billionths of a meter, and are blended with carbon tubes of same size. Both elements make a network that interact differently with each volatile compound that a person breaths out.

Haick and his team collected 2800 breaths from 1400 patients who had 17 different diseases from cancer, inflammation and neurological disorders. The sample of each disease was passed through the device that produced chemicals data. 

After collection, the team applied artificial intelligence to the collected data to detect the compounds. A report of journal ACS Nano shows that, the data from device could be used to detect the disease, and the result was 9 out of ten.

The researchers say that, each disease has its different breath print. Nearly 100 or more volatile chemicals in a breath could help detect a certain disease, according to Quartz via Engadget.

The device is not yet tested to an accurate level, because the success rate should be close to 99 percent than the current 86 percent rates. But, if it gets successful, then it would be huge accomplishment developed from an old technique.

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<a href="/latest_stories/all/all/20" rel="author">Sumayah Aamir</a>
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