2016 Was The Hottest Year On Record Globally

Posted: Jan 19 2017, 3:26am CST | by , Updated: Jan 19 2017, 3:34am CST, in News | Latest Science News

 

2016 was the Hottest Year on Record Globally
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  • Previous Year was the Hottest Worldwide
 

The reports from both NASA and NOAA prove that the previous year was the hottest on a worldwide level.

The 2016 temperatures around the global village were warm indeed. In fact, they were the highest since record-keeping began on an official basis in 1880. Both NASA and NOAA led research into the matter and came up with pretty much the same results.

The average temperature in 2016 was 0.99 degrees Celsius warmer than the average temperature in the mid-20th century. Thus 2016 was the third year in a row to experience such soaring temperatures. 

The temperatures of 2016 are a trend that had been on the ascendant since a long period of time. NASA’s GISS announced the finding in its report and the NOAA’s report also concurred with it.

Since measurement methods get transformed over the passage of time, there were bound to be hitches on the way to an accurate portrayal of the global temperatures.

Yet even after taking this discrepancy into account, 2016 remains the warmest year on record. This statement can be ratified with 95% accuracy. 

The way to global warming and climate change is as clear as the light of day. It is undeniable. Since the late 19th century, the average surface temperature of the globe has shot up by 1.1 degrees Celsius.

The reason is the burgeoning of carbon dioxide pollution not to mention other greenhouse gases released into the atmosphere. The bulk of the heat got generated during the past 35 years or so.

16 of the 17 warmest years came after 2001. Such natural contributors as El Nino and La Nina were also responsible for the extra warming. 

The wind and weather patterns changed thanks to these two phenomena. The weather basically has an effect on a local level, so not every region experienced the same impact of El Nino and La Nina.

NASA used the raw data from over 6300 weather stations. The tabulations had an algorithm applied to them and thus the results were forthcoming. 

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<a href="/latest_stories/all/all/20" rel="author">Sumayah Aamir</a>
Sumayah Aamir (Google+) has deep experience in analyzing the latest trends.

 

 

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