Aging Accelerates Due To 10 Hours Of Daily Sitting With Low Physical Activity

Posted: Jan 19 2017, 6:13am CST | by , in News | Latest Science News

 

Aging Accelerates due to 10 Hours of Daily Sitting With Low Physical Activity
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Excessive sitting (more than 0 hours daily) and less active life increases biological age in women

New research shows that elderly women sitting consistently for 10 hrs.get cells that are 8 years older than active women. Researchers conducted this research at University of California San Diego School of Medicine. The study published in the American Journal of Epidemiology, on January 18.

The study observed that elderly women who sit more than 10 hrs. without any physical activity have short telomeres, the small caps existing on the ends of DNA, resembling the plastic tops of shoe laces that prevent chromosomes from damage.

When a cell gets old, its telomeres also gets shorter, and certain factors, like health, obesity, and smoking also enhance the process. Short telomeres cause cardiovascular disease, cancers or diabetes.

The cells get older faster in sedentary lifestyle, because both biological and chronological ages don’t match with each other, explained by Aladdin Shadyab, PhD, lead author of the study with the Department of Family Medicine and Public Health at UC San Diego School of Medicine.

The research team was the first one to measure a link between sedentary time and exercises that affect aging biomarker.

The study included 1500 elderly women between 64 to 95 years old. The study also investigated chronic diseases in women with postmenopause. Women completed the questionnaires and were asked to wear accelerometer on their right hip for seven days during sleeping and waking to observe their movements.

The research team found that women who sat longer, but also did 30 minutes exercise daily did not develop shorter telomeres. Exercise benefits start from very young age, and it should remain a part of our life even in 80s, said Shadyab.

The research team will also study in future, the effect of exercise on telomeres in youngsters and also in men.

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