NASA's Terra Satellite Captures Alaska's Bogoslof Volcano Eruption In Wrapped White

Posted: Jan 21 2017, 1:57am CST | by , in News | Latest Science News

 

NASA's Terra Satellite Captures Alaska's Bogoslof Volcano Eruption in Wrapped White
Credit: NASA
 

MODIS an instrument in NASA's satellite Terra captured Alaskan Volcanic Eruption Wrapped in White

MODIS captured Alaska's erupting Bogoslof  Volcano on January 18. The eruption looked like cloud cladded in white. MODIS was used by NASA Terra satellite, and the Bogoslof  Volcano exists on Bogoslof Island at 53 55'38" north latitude and 168 2'4" west longitudes, along the southern edge of the Bering Sea. It is located 35 miles northwest of Unalaska Island which is part of the Aleutian Island chain.

MODIS has moderate resolution and it captured the image of volcano on January 18 at 5.35 p.m. EST. The volcano created dark brown ash plum that was very prominent in the image, as it existed in the white clouds that are linked with low pressure southern quadrant.

AVO or Alaska Volcano Observatory is U.S. Geological Survey’s cooperative program of the University of Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute, and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys. AVO also gives updates regarding eruption levels of volcano. The eruption has four stages, including Red, Orange, Yellow and Green.

Every color states different stages, like green is a non-eruptive stage, orange shows severe volcanoes, yellow shows that volcano is in an unrest state, and red shows that the eruption is underway. Red state happened on January 19th.

On January 18, the pilots announced the eruption as they saw clouds at an altitude of 31000 feet where winds were carrying the clouds towards Bering Sea. Lightning also happened due to eruption.

NASA’s Terra satellite when reached over eruption, AVO observed clouds in the northeast of Bogoslof. The cloud was dark brown, rich in ash that was richer than the cloud observed in 2016 due to eruption. The image also showed lava at the surface that surrounded the vent, that was observed for the first time during eruption.

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<a href="/latest_stories/all/all/20" rel="author">Sumayah Aamir</a>
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