Special Wind Turbine Can Survive Winds That Destroy Others

Posted: Jan 23 2017, 5:15am CST | by , in News | Technology News

 

Special wind turbine can survive winds that destroy others
 

Japanese firms use tech that takes advantage of unusual energy savings techniques

A Japanese man called Atsushi Shimizu has created a very unusual wind turbine used for generating electricity. The turbine is placed near the city of Nanjo, Okinawa. That city is known as quite the hotbed for typhoons and on September 6 of last year the area was struck by its 13th typhoon of the season. Shimizu is the creator of a special wind turbine that can continue to generate electricity in the typhoon force winds of the storms.

Not only can the turbine generate electricity and operate during the storm, but this design allows the turbine to survive these high winds. Rather than having massive fan blades like most wind turbines, the design of this turbine has three cylinders that are each 3-meters tall around a central axis. Those three cylinders rotate to generate electricity of up to 1kW in the prototype using something called Magnus force. This turbine could mean typhoons are a good thing for electric companies in the future.

Another company in Bibai, Hokkaido collects massive amounts of snow each year to the tune of about 3,600 tons of the white stuff. The company uses a tractor to push the massive amount of snow into a giant warehouse all winter and then the snow is used to help keep the inside temperature of the facility, which stores rice, at 5C and 70% humidity all summer long. By using the snow, the company saves an estimated 4 million yen each year on electricity, that is about $34,800 US.

Another interesting source of electricity generation being studied in Japan is the harnessing of vibrations created as people walk around. A firm called Soundpower based in Fujisawa, Kanagawa Prefecture has a floor that is able to convert footsteps into electricity. The floor uses a special layer with piezoelectric elements where the vibrations of someone walking the floor disrupts the internal electrical balance of the piezoelectric elements and creates voltage that generates electricity.

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<a href="/latest_stories/all/all/3" rel="author">Shane McGlaun</a>
Tech and Car expert Shane McGlaun (Google) reports about what's new in these two sectors. His extensive experience in testing cars, computer hardware and consumer electronics enable him to effectively qualify new products and trends. If you want us review your product, please contact Shane.
Shane can be contacted directly at shane@i4u.com.

 

 

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