Baby Monitors Can Be Harmful

Posted: Jan 25 2017, 9:30am CST | by , in News | Latest Science News

 

Baby Monitors can be Harmful
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  • Research shows that Latest Baby Monitors could Lead to Complications
 

Recent research has shown that the latest infant monitors could actually lead to complications. They are a health hazard waiting to happen and hence at best avoided.

Besides the large number of wearable devices, the novel gadgets for babies have seen quite a boom in the market. Fussy mothers and protective fathers buy these gizmos which can be attached to the little baby’s body without the least bit of hindrance.

These contraptions can gauge the vital signs, sleep patterns and any out-of-the-way movements that the baby makes during its normal day-to-day existence. 

Some companies that make these contraptions claim that they can even help prevent such things as SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome). Yet this is more of an advertising and media hype than the patent truth. Not a single one of these devices has been tested and approved of by the FDA.

They hardly have any value and may in fact do more harm rather than protect the vulnerable baby. It is indeed a case of being over-scrupulous and taking on the scourge of over diagnosis. Sometimes it seems the cure is worse than the disease. 

There is the Owlet, which is a sock-based monitor and costs $250. The infant’s heartbeat rate and oxygenation in the body are monitored closely via this gizmo, according to ArsTechnica.

Even the makers of this contraption have posted a YouTube video clip where it is categorically stated that the device does not prevent SIDS. False alarms, unnecessary trips to the general practitioner, blood tests and scans thus become the order of the day when such devices are relied upon by parents.

The FDA has yet to endorse such products which have dubious value. They are nothing but gimmicks that are being churned out to bamboozle the public into letting go of their cold hard-earned cash. 

The findings of this new research got published on Tuesday in JAMA.

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<a href="/latest_stories/all/all/20" rel="author">Sumayah Aamir</a>
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