Heat From Sun Can Keep Us Cool Too

Posted: Feb 1 2017, 6:45am CST | by , in News | Latest Science News

 

Heat From Sun can Keep Us Cool too
Heat-absorbing panels on Desert Mountain High School in Arizona form part of the world’s largest solar-thermal air-conditioning system. Credit: Solid via Nature.com
 

Research shows that heat from Sun can keep us cool

Solar thermal technology will now make our buildings cool. Hotel Star Sapphire in Dawei, Myanmar gets its air condition through dark glass tubes that change sunlight into cooling.

The tubes are not typical solar panels that give us electricity, but they get heat from the sun to make buildings cool. This type of cooling is called solar thermal and energy experts believe that it can help meet global demand for energy.

Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change states that till 2100 the need for electricity driven cooling flow will become 30 times less than it was in 2000.

Solar thermal technology is getting very popular in the world,and it’s installed in several hotels, shopping centers and other buildings. There are 1200 solar thermal systems installed so far in different areas, according to Nature

Manufacturing companies of solar thermal chillers use 90 percent less electricity than conventional air conditioners. More researches are going on to update the system. But, several issues happen that affects the number of solar thermal panels and still every year we have 100 million conventional air conditions.

Solar thermal chillers are expensive than conventional air conditioners, and the cost is 5 times more, said Daniel Mugnier, an engineer with the solar-technologies company Tecsol in Perpignan, France. Though, the cost is reducing, but still investment is needed to update the technology and that’s a pity.

Solar thermal technology gives several benefits, like it can reduce load of electrical grid, and can also reduce the blackouts and use of dirty energy sources. Besides, solar thermal technology is noiseless and it uses environmental friendly refrigerators.

High quantity of solar heat is available where there is a large demand for cooling. Such areas seem to fit the phrase that, marriage is made in heaven, said Christos Markides, a solar researcher at Imperial College London.

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