SpaceX Set To Launch First Mission From Historic NASA Pad On Feb 18

Posted: Feb 9 2017, 4:59am CST | by , in News | Latest Science News

 

SpaceX Set to Launch First Mission From Historic NASA Pad on Feb 18
In this handout provided by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), landed SpaceX rockets sit in Launch Complex 39 at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida. Credit: Getty Images
 

SpaceX will have first launch from historic Launch Complex 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center on Feb 18.

SpaceX is going to launch a mission from the Complex 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. This is the first time it will lunch from this location. A private company made changes to the pad for Falcon 9 and Falcon heavy rockets launch.

Space x will launch its 10th cargo to ISS for NASA that will happen on Feb 18. The purpose of mission is to supply stuff to crew and for experiments running in orbiting lab.

The experiments also include muscle cell experiment created by high school students. The launch will happen for the first time from the newly renovated venue as historic Launch Complex 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

The pad was constructed in 1960 and hosted several missions, like Apollo 11 that took humans to moon for the first time. It was also the last space shuttle. Space X took the pad on lease from NASA in 2014.

SpaceX made changes to the pad to make it good for falcon 9 and falcon heavy rockets. The falcon 9 will carry a robotic Dragon spacecraft filled with more than 5,500 lbs. (2,500 kg) of cargo to the orbit on Feb 18, said NASA officials. Falcon 9 will bring back the Dragon with 5,000 lbs. (2,300 kg) of cargo to Earth after a stay.

The lunch will be a result of high school students’ experiments at Craft Academy at Morehead State University, where they will test the effect of microgravity on smooth muscle cell contraction.  The students will use rat’s cells to understand how the arteries and cell function.

Another experiment by Dragon will include the observation of superbug MRSA to see how the bacterium develops and mutates without gravity pull. According to Space.com, it will be an experiment to research antibody crystals, a new system that will monitor gases and lightning in the planet’s stratosphere.

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