A Peanut-Shaped Asteroid Could Crash Into The Earth

Posted: Feb 15 2017, 7:03am CST | by , in News | Latest Science News

 

A Peanut-Shaped Asteroid Could Crash into the Earth
 

Recently discovered asteroid resembles a large peanut that may one day strike the earth

The Arecibo Observatory can detect radio signals from aliens. Arecibo is a very large radio telescope that’s built in the Puerto Rican sinkhole. The observatory also serves as a strong radar station that can detect different objects in space, and can also record the echoes.

Arecibo started the observation on Sunday and captured a fast moving object, an asteroid dubbed 2015 BN509. The asteroid is a small rock that seems a large peanut.

But,scientists say that the asteroid is as big as its 200 meters wide and 400 meters long, so you can see that it’s taller than the Empire State Building in New York.

NASA declared the asteroid as hazardous that means there is a possibility that it might strike the earth someday, according to Mail Online via BusinessInsider.

The images of asteroid were posted on twitter by Corey S Powell that attracted several people. The Arecibo scientists include Ed Rivera who is from the Universities Space Research Association and also studies Arecibo data.

He sent a mailto Business Insider and said that asteroid 2015 BN509 came across Earth in the beginning of this week at a speed of about 70,500 kilometers per hour.

Rivera said that this peanut shaped asteroid shows it is a contact binary where two asteroid parts fell back together as they were not orbiting successfully. He also said that such asteroids are common because one in every six space rocks has this shape.

But, 2015 BN509, that was first discovered in 2005 shows that it swings close to earth. Its distance near our earth is about 14 times the distance between Earth and the moon.

Rivera also said that it’s really important to capture such NEOs, the Near Earth Objects because they are uncertain. Through Arecibo, the scientists can observe the shape, size, composition, spinning, and geology of the asteroids.

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