Amazon Fighting In Court To Deny Access To Echo Voice Recordings In Murder Case

Posted: Feb 24 2017, 5:44am CST | by , in News | Latest Business News

 

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Amazon fighting in court to deny access to Echo voice recordings in murder case
 

Amazon is fighting the request for audio files in court

Prosecutors in a murder investigation are trying to get Amazon to release any voice recordings made by the Amazon Echo speaker in the home where the alleged murder took place. This is the first formal legal response to a request for audio recordings to be handed over. Amazon for its part claims that the prosecutors have failed to establish that it was necessary to release the recordings.

Amazon maintains that it has to weigh customer privacy against requests for this type of information from law enforcement officials. The prosecutors in the case maintain that any voice recordings made by the Echo speaker could shed light on what happened in the home on the night Victor Collins died.

Collins was found floating face up in a friend's hot tub in November of 2015. The friend, one James Andrew Bates, was charged with murder and has pled not guilty. Bates is the one who called police in Bentonville, Arkansas when he found the body.

Reports indicate that Collins had a swollen eye and lips at the time of death and that blood spots were around the rim of the hot tub. Music playing on the back patio where the hot tub was located is thought to have been streamed by the Echo speaker, and the device might have recorded audio of what happened.

Amazon's legal team has filed a motion to prevent access to the information, the legal team's court filing read, "Given the important First Amendment and privacy implications at stake, the warrant should be quashed unless the Court finds that the State has met its heightened burden for compelled production of such materials."

Echo speakers record audio heard for a second before it detects a wake word and continues to record after the wake word is spoken. That audio is then sent to Amazon servers where it is interpreted and the Echo is told how to respond.

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<a href="/latest_stories/all/all/3" rel="author">Shane McGlaun</a>
Tech and Car expert Shane McGlaun (Google) reports about what's new in these two sectors. His extensive experience in testing cars, computer hardware and consumer electronics enable him to effectively qualify new products and trends. If you want us review your product, please contact Shane.
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