How Technology Can Help You Prove Landlord Negligence

Posted: Sep 23 2017, 6:46am CDT | by , Updated: Sep 25 2017, 6:44am CDT, in News

 

How Technology Can Help You Prove Landlord Negligence
How Technology Can Help You Prove Landlord Negligence
 

3 Ways Tech Can Track Landlord Neglect

Landlord negligence, essentially situations in which a landlord fails to uphold their legal obligations, can pose serious dangers to tenants, but many will fight any such claims stating that the circumstances in question are not their fault. After all, tenants can create dangerous situations as well and should be held responsible for them. But when you have a legitimate case of landlord negligence on your hands, technology can help you prove it.

Whether you’re contending with black mold, structural problems, or lead paint, it’s time to use the tools available to hold your landlord accountable.

When The Bed Bugs Bite

Bed bugs are an epidemic in many American cities, and they may be getting harder to kill. That means landlords need to be increasingly proactive to fully eliminate them and many aren’t thorough.

When you move into a new apartment or home, take pictures or any bugs you see, use the internet to identify them, and make sure you date them. Down the road, bed bugs may be your responsibility since you could have brought them into the home yourself, but you can hold the landlord responsible if they were there when you arrived.

As for other bugs, landlords are generally responsible for most other bug infestations (barring a tenant who leaves garbage everywhere) and must provide pest management services to keep the property habitable. So make sure you’re keeping things tidy because a defensive landlord could always turn the tables and blame you for the bugs if you’ve left a mess.

Hidden Mold Hazards

Mold is one of the most dangerous things that tenants can be exposed to in an apartment; except for in rare cases, it’s almost always the landlord’s fault.

Often, the first sign of mold growth is a leak somewhere in the apartment, so if you see signs of water damage anywhere in your apartment, take photos of it and contact your landlord immediately about having the proper repairs performed. Keep all copies of documentation proving that you’ve been in communication about this – email is great because it is time stamped and you may even be able to confirm receipt. This paper trail can support your case if you need to sue your landlord for lack of habitability.

Lead Poisoning

If mold is one of the most hazardous things that adults can be exposed to in a property, then lead is one of the leading dangers facing young children. Of course, lead paint has been banned for household use since 1978, but if you live in an old property with a hands-off landlord, it’s possible they haven’t thoroughly removed any remnants.

With that in mind, if you notice chipping paint anywhere around your home, especially on windows where wear and tear can generate lead paint dust, record the problem and contact your landlord. As with mold, make sure you’re keeping a paper trail. If your landlord fails to get the paint tested, send a sample to an independent agency – and let your landlord know you’re doing so. You should also get your children tested for lead poisoning. If all of these tests come back showing serious lead exposure, you could have a high-profile negligence case on your hands.

In many ways, technology hasn’t seriously changed landlord negligence cases, but it’s made it much easier for tenants to prove that they’re in the right; it takes cases out of the realm of he-said-she-said. From photos to emails, you can take control of providing proof to support your own case and in the courtroom that can make all the difference.

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The Author

<a href="/latest_stories/all/all/68" rel="author">Larry Alton</a>
Larry is an independent business consultant specializing in tech, social media trends, business, and entrepreneurship. Follow him on Twitter and LinkedIn.

 

 

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