Menu
First Avengers: Age of Ultron Trailer Released

First Avengers: Age of Ultron Trailer Released

Jessica Biel and Justin Timberlake Squeezed Magazine to Apologize

Jessica Biel and Justin Timberlake Squeezed Magazine to Apologize

Black Friday 2014 Ads Update

Black Friday 2014 Ads Update

Taylor Swift shows her Love for Cats

Taylor Swift shows her Love for Cats

Black Friday 2014 iPad Deals will be Amazing

Black Friday 2014 iPad Deals will be Amazing

Feds Demand User Account Passwords from Web Firms

Jul 26 2013, 5:12am CDT | by , in News | Technology News

Feds Demand User Account Passwords from Web Firms
 
 

The Federal Government is at it once again. Latest news has it that the Feds are demanding user passwords from various web companies. This is an extreme form of the invasion of individual privacy.

Isn’t Big Government a pain in the neck? Apparently that is so true. The Feds have been hounding web companies like Microsoft and Yahoo to divulge the password codes of their users according to CNet. This is so these high handed government officials can sneak a peek into the private online messages of everyday users. This news still needs to be corroborated by hard evidence.


Yet where there is fire there will be smoke. Both Microsoft and Yahoo deny any truth to the charges. Their intentions are pure and they would never give away any confidential information regarding any person using their email accounts. But if there is some substance to this latest scoop which is doing the rounds, then it is cause for worry.

Basically government agencies are asking around for encryption keys. One step further than this lies information related to passwords. Ever since Edward Snowden revealed top secret information regarding the NSA’s spying activities, a heated debate has been going on regarding the role of the government. Some pretty important names were named.

Companies such as Microsoft, Yahoo, Apple and Google were just a few among the long list of accomplices. They were alleged to have helped the government spy on the emails of ordinary citizens. The threats of terrorism and crime were obviously being dealt with via this extreme methodology. But the question is: is a police state worth it?  

Comments

blog comments powered by Disqus