Latest News: Technology |  Celebrity |  Movies |  Apple |  Cars |  Business |  Sports |  TV Shows |  Geek

Trending

Filed under: News | Technology News

 

NSA collects all phone calls in a foreign country

Mar 18 2014, 3:16pm CDT | by

1 Updates
NSA collects all phone calls in a foreign country
 
 

YouTube Videos Comments

Full Story

NSA collects all phone calls in a foreign country

WASHINGTON (AP) — The National Security Agency has been recording all of a foreign country's phone calls, then listening to the conversations up to a month later, The Washington Post reported Tuesday.

At the request of U.S. officials, the Post said it would not identify the targeted country or other countries where the program's use was envisioned by officials.

The program is the latest revelation from a trove of classified documents that former NSA systems analyst Edward Snowden leaked to certain news organizations last year. Most of those documents have described the U.S. collecting massive amounts of data and text. This program is different in that it records phone calls.

This NSA program dates to 2009 and is called MYSTIC, according to documents obtained by the Post. It is used to intercept conversations in one specific country, but documents show the NSA intends to use it in other countries, the Post said.

It records all conversations across the unidentified foreign country and stores billions of them for 30 days. The program wasn't fully operational until 2011. One of the program's senior managers told the Post that MYSTIC is comparable to a time machine, meaning voices from any call can be replayed without requiring the NSA to identify a person before the conversations are collected.

The conversations swept up likely include those of Americans who make calls to or from the targeted country. Civil libertarians are concerned that this program and others like it will target other countries and that the NSA will eventually hold the data longer than what was defined its original charter and use it for other reasons.

"This is a truly chilling revelation, and it's one that underscores how high the stakes are in the debate we're now having about bulk surveillance," Jameel Jaffer, American Civil Liberties Union deputy legal director, said in a statement. "The NSA has always wanted to record everything, and now it has the capacity to do so."

The White House would not comment on the specific program described by the Post. But National Security Council spokeswoman Caitlin Hayden said information sought by the U.S. intelligence community is, in many cases, hidden in the "large and complex system" of global communications.

"The United States must consequently collect signals intelligence in bulk in certain circumstances in order to identify these threats," Hayden said in a statement. She said the presidential directive that authorizes this type of collection "makes clear that signals intelligence collected in bulk may only be used to meet specific security requirements."

The NSA is authorized to collect in bulk signals intelligence — the type of intelligence that comes from radio signals and communications, for example, as long as the purpose of the collection is to counter threats regarding espionage, terrorism, proliferation, cyber security, safety of U.S. troops and transnational crime.

Bulk collection means collecting everything, even if some of what's collected has nothing to do with national security. Most of the conversations collected under the NSA program would be irrelevant, the Post said.

The NSA would not confirm the existence of the MYSTIC program. But a spokeswoman said that the NSA's collection programs are legal and done for national security purposes.

"NSA does not conduct signals intelligence collection in any country, or anywhere in the world, unless it is necessary to advance U.S. national security and foreign policy interests and to protect its citizens and the citizens of its allies and partners from harm," NSA spokeswoman Vanee Vines said in an email.

Vines said it jeopardizes national security when details about classified intelligence programs are made public.

Source: AP

 

iPad Air Giveaway. Win a free iPad Air.

You Might Also Like

Updates


Sponsored Update


Advertisement


More From the Web

Shopping Deals

 
 
 

<a href="/latest_stories/all/all/30" rel="author">Associated Press</a>
The Associated Press (AP) is one of the largest and most trusted sources of independent newsgathering, supplying a steady stream of news to its members, international subscribers and commercial customers.

 

 

Comments

blog comments powered by Disqus

Latest stories

Karrueche Tran Under Fire for Blue Ivy Comments
Karrueche Tran Under Fire for Blue Ivy Comments
Beyoncé fans are upset with Karrueche.
 
 
Bill Hader Thinks Justin Bieber Is Worst &quot;SNL&quot; Of All Time
Bill Hader Thinks Justin Bieber Is Worst "SNL" Host of All Time
Not the first time he's mentioned his dislike for the pop star.
 
 
Doc Rivers Gets 5-Year Extension With Los Angeles Clippers
Doc Rivers Gets 5-Year Extension With Los Angeles Clippers
The Los Angeles Clippers gave president of basketball operations and head coach Glenn "Doc" Rivers a five-year contract extension on Aug. 27 which runs through the 2018-19 NBA season. It was new Clippers owner Steve Ballmer's first major move since officially purchasing the franchise earlier this month.
 
 
Josh Gordon's 1-Year Suspension for Substance Abuse Upheld
Josh Gordon's 1-Year Suspension for Substance Abuse Upheld
The NFL upheld its one-year suspension for Cleveland Browns wide receiver Josh Gordon on Aug. 27 for violating the league's substance abuse policy.
 
 
 

About the Geek Mind

The “geek mind” is concerned with more than just the latest iPhone rumors, or which company will win the gaming console wars. I4U is concerned with more than just the latest photo shoot or other celebrity gossip.

The “geek mind” is concerned with life, in all its different forms and facets. The geek mind wants to know about societal and financial issues, both abroad and at home. If a Fortune 500 decides to raise their minimum wage, or any high priority news, the geek mind wants to know. The geek mind wants to know the top teams in the National Football League, or who’s likely to win the NBA Finals this coming year. The geek mind wants to know who the hottest new models are, or whether the newest blockbuster movie is worth seeing. The geek mind wants to know. The geek mind wants—needs—knowledge.

Read more about The Geek Mind.